Central east China Beijing

 The Great Wall just north of Beijing

The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steep Several walls were being built as early as the 7th century BC; these, later joined together and made bigger and stronger, are collectively referred to as the Great Wall. Especially famous is the wall built in 220–206 BC by Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. Little of that wall remains. The Great Wall has been rebuilt, maintained, and enhanced over various dynasties; the majority of the existing wall is from the Ming Dynasty(1368–1644).

The Great Wall of China at Jinshanling-edit.jpg

Downtown, Tiananmen square, Palace city gate.

Tienanmen Square is a city square in the center of Beijing, China, named after the  Tienanmen (“Gate of Heavenly Peace”) located to its north, separating it from the Forbidden City. The square contains the, Monument to the peoples heroes, the, Great Hall of the People, the National Museum of China,, and the Mausoleum of Mao Zedong. Mao Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People’s Republic of China in the square on October 1, 1949; the anniversary of this event is still observed there. Tienanmen Square is within the top ten largest city squares in the world (440,500 m2 – 880×500 m or 109 acres – 960×550 yd). It has great cultural significance as it was the site of several important events in Chinese history.

 

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The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former seat of Imperial Chinese  Dragon Throne from the Ming Dynasty to the end of the Qing Dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years.

Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings and covers 72 ha (over 180 acres). The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese Palatial architecture and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia and elsewhere. The Forbidden City was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987, and is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Inside Palace, Raising flag ceremony.

Beijing National Stadium, officially the National Stadium (Chinese: 国家体育场; Pinyin: Guójiā Tǐyùchǎng; literally: “State Stadium”), also known as the Bird’s Nest (鸟巢Niǎocháo), is a stadium in Beijing. The stadium (BNS) was jointly designed by architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron of Herzog & Meuron, project architect Stefan Marbach, artist Ai Weiwei, and CADG which was led by chief architect Li Xinggang. The stadium was designed for use throughout the 2008 summer Olympics and Paralympics and will be used again in the 2022 Winter Olympics and  Paralympics  The Bird’s Nest sometimes has some extra temporary large screens installed at the stands of the stadium.

Birds nest Olympic center

Beijing national stadium.jpg

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